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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 347 (some duplicates have been removed)
are confidential under section f1.110b are not, in fact, covered by that section. although she underlined the operative description of the confidential documents, the word "communications" or any word that would describe an email is missing. under the constitutional requirements for public access, these statutes must be read narrowly. thus, the description of what is confidential can't be expanded to cover communications; which are a completely animal in the investigative file, which was the subject of my complaint. those should also be disclosable, unless otherwise exempt and once an investigation is closed i maintain it becomes a public record and the entire file needs to be released. this commission should ask for an explanation from mr. st. croix about why he forget that these emails were in the file. you should have been made aware of that, at least by last october 22nd. and it took miss herrick, in my humble opinion, the wrong jurisdiction to arrive at that conclusion for you. so i am encouraging you to release those emails. it's your ethical duty to do so and it's not your ethical
something and you can honor confidentiality, but you don't have to get into this ridiculous secrecy where nothing can be revealed. because that feels like you are doing something wrong. thank you. >> good afternoon, thank you. i think it's very important to say a few words in support of mr. menat shaw on this issue. and the memo, the two memos, one from your staff and the one from the outside attorney are regrettably ambiguous. mr. menat shaw is quite right to point out that unless something is specifically exempt, it's by definition "a public record," period and it's a public record and disclosable unless it can be withheld under one of the specific sections of the state law. and if you look at the two charter sections that have been quoted, both of them are set out within the scope of the applicable state law. now the memo before you says that we're not exempt from disclosure, but may be disclosed. well, a determination that they may be disclosed means that they were public records and your obligation is to disclose them. now i can't help, but observe, because it's come up so many ti
records of the commission that are pertinent to an investigation are confidential under charter section c3-699.13. however, miss herrick identified three pages' of emails that don't fall into either of those categories, in her opinion. and are therefore subject to disclosure. this is obviously a complicated analysis looking at state law, the charter, and the sunshine ordinance. in this case i believe the sunshine ordinance is trumped by these two charter provisions that make certain records confidential and to the extent what that they are confidential, they are confidential under evidence code second, 1040 and not subject to disclosure. again to the extent that these three pages don't fall into those categories, i believe they are subject to disclosure in a redacted fashion. >> that is not what the sotf ruled >> mr. shaw, please. you had your opportunity to speak. mr. pilpel you may continue. mr. shaw, please give mr. pilpel a chance to speak. thank you. >> so to conclude, i believe that those three pages should be provided. neither memo discusses what the staff's rationale
the sunshine ordinance is trumped by these two charter provisions that make certain records confidential and to the extent what that they are confidential, they are confidential under evidence code second, 1040 and not subject to disclosure. again to the extent that these three pages don't fall into those categories, i believe they are subject to disclosure in a redacted fashion. >> that is not what the sotf ruled >> mr. shaw, please. you had your opportunity to speak. mr. pilpel you may continue. mr. shaw, please give mr. pilpel a chance to speak. thank you. >> so to conclude, i believe that those three pages should be provided. neither memo discusses what the staff's rationale for non-disclosure at the time of the original request was. that may be something that is worth discussing. so i think it goes to the question of whether there was a willful violation or a different sort of matter? i believe mr. menat shaw is free to make a request at any time, particularly now that he believes that the matter is concluded and to the extent that there are records available post a concluded i
studies, audits, investigations and other reports shall be confidential? >> that is -- >> that is the first part of it. >> first part. >> and the second quarter part of the standards is records of any investigation shall be considered confidential information to the extent permitted by state law. >> correct. and then there is the evidence code 1040 section defining "official information." >> okay. and that portion we don't have in our memo, right? tonight? >> here it is if you want to take a look at it. >> okay. :mr. givner, have i missed anything? >> no, no. i was just searching to see if i had evidence code 1040. i would note that infection f1.8110b involves whistle-blower complaints and the second section you noted c3699-13 involves ethics investigations. do commissioners have objections to taking public comment now. >> no. >> it sound like what you are offering to mr. shaw is something outside of public comment and as a party to this proceeding you are giving him five minutes and after mr. shaw's five minutes open up the floor for public c
to be saying here, if you redact the confidential portions, i.e., the portions that relate to the investigation, the fact of the internal communication could be disclosable. again, i think i shared my view we should follow miss herrick's recommendation to produce the redacted document. with respect to whether this is a willful violation of the sunshine ordinance, i do not think it is. and the reason is as follows: this was part of the file. it's been heavily redacted as a result of containing confidential information that is protected. and i think it was right to withhold the document. mr. givner, what is our ability and/or our requirements with respect to redacting and producing documents? >> point of order. >> that would be otherwise-- >> through the chair, point of order, i could have sworn that the agenda for tonight said you would arrive at making one decision before you began evaluating whether it's willful. so before reaching your first step appears ethically wrong. >> mr. met shaw, please sit down. mr. givner. >> so your question? >> are we obligated to produce confidential docu
. to avoid prison, she became a police confidential informant. she was murdered in a botched undercover operation. we will speak with her mother margie weiss. >> making the world a safer and better place so this never happens to any more of our children. as long as i am alive, i will keep her spirit alive. >> we will also speak with new yorker reporter sarah stillman who just won a polk award for her keys, "beef throwaways -- "the throwaways." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the united nations continues to warn of a growing humanitarian crisis as a result of syria's unrelenting civil war. on tuesday, emergency relief coordinator valerie amos said much of the rebel-held north remains cut off from darlene needed aid. >> the situation in syria is getting worse. the violence is causing a devastating impact on the lives of ordinary people. we are negotiating with armed groups on the ground to reach more people in need. we are not reaching enough of those who require our help. >> the world health organizati
by the charter and state law and there is good reason for confidentialitis, i think as i set at the last meeting. we need to protect whistle-blowers and need to protect people who talk to commission investigators and controller's investigators, in order to try to make this system work. so i don't think i'm alone in that. >> next item on the agenda is discussion and possible action on the ethics commission budget. >> mr. st. croix, would you like to introduce this matter? >> so the numbers break down as before you in the memo. we have been asked in the past several budget years due to difficulties with city budget to make cuts so substantial that would prove damaging to the commission's commission. this year, although budget news is good, it's not fantastic and the mayor's office is requesting what seems to be very minor cuts for the next two fiscal years. approximately $34,000 each of those years from us. our prior custom has been to respectfully request that our budget not be cut, but not ask for increases so that we maintain our independence as an independent agency in making these decisio
any investigation? one way to find out is to request documents. the documents are not confidential. it's the information that is confidential. for example, if you request information about an fbi investigation, they might send you documents that are completely black with nothing except black on it. but you know that there is a document; that something was done. so if we ask for something, a document or some information, you could still give the public a document and hold onto the information. that way we know that something was done on paper, but that we can't have the information. thank you. >> commissioners, ray hart, director of san francisco open government. i think it's kind of circular reasoning or some sort -- i don't know how to describe it -- to say that because it took us two years to get to this point, it obviously wasn't willful because it was complicated. the law says you have a certain period of time to produce documents or explain why you are withholding them. period. it doesn't say oh, well you got a couple of years to sort of toss it around and decide whether you
relating to the matter that was discussed in confidential session, keep that confidential? that is perhaps not the most el eloquent motion i have ever made. >> [ laughter ] >> so moved. >> second. >> public comment? hearing none, all in favor? >> aye. >> opposed? there are none. mr. st. croix, can you make the announcements? >> finding of probable cause for ethics commission complaint 13-111013, at its regular meeting of january 28th, 2013, in the matter of ethics complaint 13-1103,the ethics commission made a determination that there is probably cause to believe the following violations of the san francisco campaign and governmental conduct code occurred and that the respondents committed them. one violation of san francisco campaign and governmental conduct code section 1.1 16 subsection a2 for reporting and receiving a loan to his candidate committee in excess of $120,000. two, one violation of san francisco campaign and governmental conduct code section 1.1 16, subsection c, for repaying aloan amount in excess of $120,000. 3 one violation of california government code section 8
could do without a formal change to the code? >> i think the question of maintaining the confidentiality of communications in closed session is an issue we'd have to look at wpt with with that respect to the ad hoc committee. we could look at once it's been agenda ized so take a look at the issue more closely and bring it back next month with a recommendation. >> what i would suggest then i'm not comfortable adopting this today. and so i would suggest continuing this one month and i don't think we have to wait a month to receive advice on what we need to do i think as soon as that advice is ready hopefully within a day or two if that's conceivable -- if that's the only way we can do that then we can do that as quickly as we can. this is a once in a blue moon opportunity and i think it's very critical that we have the best process possible and that is precisely why there were conversations about having a five person committee to do this exhaustive work. >> so before we actually look at delaying a month which i think would set us back i lot i want to ask if there's any other way we ca
to confidentiality. we need access to patient identifiable information, not because we report patient identifiable information, but you needed to aggravate across millions of lives, to be able to report on quality and utilization and cost. we also need access to reimburse amounts from health insurance companies which are often protected by planned provider confidentiality clauses. how are we going to strike a balance between this desire for confidentiality and the desire for openness and transparency when we really need to be able to do both through the exchange of electronic information? >> christianne? >> whose confidentiality? we want to see quality information. that requires access to that data set. the tiger team of the policy committee has done great work thinking to the idea of meaningful choice. it is that you should not be surprised by the use of my data or the re-use of my data. if we have that as our guide, i think the question becomes the confidentiality and the business practices that happened around us outside of the consumer. that tend to block access to a lot of bad data. from the
insurance. jen waters of the column consumer confidential found at marketwatch.com joins us, and jen, i have to say, i always feel like it is a rip-off. is it worth it? > > in some cases it could be a rip-off. but i will tell you, here is the thing - and business travelers really need to think about this more than anyone else, particularly if they are traveling out of the country - and it's that you really should have some kind of, another level of insurance to cover you, particularly in medical emergencies. they have something called medevac, which is medical emergency evacuation plan, and if you are stuck somewhere in a foreign country and you get sick or you hurt yourself or you just kind of don't feel well, it is not a full-blown sickness, then you should have that, because they will take you and they will hold your hand through the whole process. > that sounds worth it jen. > > that is worth it if you are doing that, but i will tell you, and here is the other thing that should be worth it, and i think we found this out with the carnival triumph people, is that, if there is some kind of
as 17 cents in the past week alone. plus, a confidential justice department says the government can order the killing of american citizens. wait until we tell you why. >>> and new details on the murder of navy s.e.a.l. chris crime. former president george h.b. bush out and about. and governor chris christie gets back at all those fat jokes made at his expense. "early today" starts right now. >> announcer: this is "early today" for tuesday, february 5th, 2013. >>> and a very good morning to you, i'm veronica de la cruz. before you head out, you might want to pad your wallet, gas prices up again. $3.52 that pats the highest ever for february. 17 cents from just last week, a spike of 22 cents since early joon. drivers in states like new york and california are feeling the pinch more than others. prices there are approaching $4 a gallon and that is making for extra pain at the pump. >> these higher gas prices generally affect the way i budget my money, where i choose to live and how i choose to spend my early time. >> more about the distance i'm driving. >>> a weak dollar and a decline
of this obtained in confidential fbi internal reports, regarding misbehavior of fbi employees. more on the exclusive report. >> reporter: the fbi's motto is bravery, integrity, fidelity, agents take down bank robbers and the mob. the fbi's polished image kept in the spotlight by countless tv shows and movies. >> i'm with the fbi. >> reporter: but there is another side to the fbi, contained in these confidential internal records obtained by cnn that show serious misconduct by employees, and even supervisors. assistant fbi director candace will oversees the office of special responsibility. she sends out the reports three times a year to all 6,000 employees. >> we do our very best, we don't obviously, if you know anything about our quarterlies and they're not a public document but we know that doesn't mean that cnn doesn't have a copy. there are no names or locations or job titles, we do our very best to sanitize the quarterlies so that the employee's identity is protected while imparting the knowledge as best we can, so that the employees can learn something from it. >> reporter: cnn
." >>> confidential killing. an nbc news exclusive. a justice department memo says the government can kill americans believed to be top al qaeda leaders, even if there's no active plot to attack the united states. this controversial document also has new details on the legal justification behind more drone strikes against al qaeda subjects. >>> red rover, karl rove's new push to score some winners is getting pushback from powerful conservative groups. this morning, a debate between one of rove's point men and one of his top critics. >>> and who do you know? and do you know who this guy is? you should. he just might be the most powerful person in israeli politics not named netanyahu right now. find out what an unexpected power surge from the center could mean for u.s. hopes for mideast peace. >>> good morning from washington. it's tuesday, february 5th, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. let's get to my first reads. president obama's state of the union address is just a week from today and the president is flooding the zone. worried the federal budget could dominate and limit his agen
. chris connolly got to know her in our series oscar confidential. >> reporter: she thanked her family, director and cast members. then? >> i always go home. i stopped at harvey's party for a little bit and got my parents drunk and i left and went home. >> reporter: just 22 with two best actress nominations on her resume she has hollywood buzzing with delight both at her range and at her refederal reservingly unspoiled self image. >> i have a weird job. if i remind myself of that that it's nothing more than that then i don't start thinking it's more dramatic. >> how did you lose your job? >> i -- having sex with everybody in the office. >> reporter: oscar nominated for "silver linings play book" she takes a manic pixy dream girl and fills her with vivid, captivating emotion. on the dance floor with bradley cooper. or toe to toe with this guy. >> ever since he was with you -- >> you think i'm why today's happened? i'm the reason why today happened? >> how is it like staring into robert de niro's eyes and tell him off? >> nerve wracking. i'm bad about reading scenes before. i'm trying to
university. the university board of regents voted to remove dallas evans as chair. a confidential memo revealed it d a pushs who leed not to renew the contract of the president. dallas evans had served as the board's chair since 1991. >> the ravens linebacker has been an outspoken supporter of gay rights. tonight, -- to try to stop him from speaking out in support. the democrats confirmed he was reprimanded in a letter. >> nothing like getting a job well done from the commander in chief. today president obama called the ravens coach and general manager to congratulate them on. winning the super on here is a portion of that phone call. -- winning the super bowl. here's a portion of that phone call >> i just wanted to say congratulations. for you to stay steady the way you did is a great feat. >> thank you. sometimes the greatest accomplishments are born from diversity and our guys prove that. >> you and me we should try to do things easy or smoothes. [laughter] >> i would like to know what it feels like. it has never happened to me. but it was a great game. you know, we are going to inv
is on capitol hill today on gun control. they wish to take a closer look at the confidentiality of gun instruction. >> the extensive search continues for the former lapd officer accused of killing three people including a police officer. thousands of officers have and joke -- have joined that manhunt. hundreds of tips have poured in, prompted by a $1 million reward. professional bounty hunters now worry this may encourage citizens to take the law into their whole -- into their own hands. >> it is kind of like a gold rush. it is going to attract a lot of people from the backwoods. this is a manhunt. the bounty hunters that recover those who skips for bail bonds they know better. >> the district attorney has filed murder charges. >> thousands of people lined the roads in texas today. a navy seal burial possession appeared. he was killed in a texas shooting along with his friend. a veteran he was trying to help. it will be buried two hundred miles away in austin. -- he will be buried 200 miles away in austin. >> farmers from all over maryland gathered in annapolis this morning to protest
anonymous. just for confidentiality. but it would help us to know so that we make sure that maybe we were interacting with that person. >> reporter: loyola officials declined an on-camera interview, but say they're already evaluating the sickened student's roommates and say there is no significant health risk to the rest of the university. >> reporter: bacterial meningitis symptoms include chills, fever, headache, stiff neck and rashes. those are many of the same symptoms that can be associated with the flu. >> that's the complication here, right? it is flu season. so we don't want to have the worried well flooding their doctors' offices. so if you have been -- if you are a loyola student and you think that you have had contact with the person, then in that situation, i would recommend contacting your doctor. but meningitis is not something that you can get just by confidential contact. -- casual contact. >> reporter: and we are told that that sickened student remains in the hospital, in serious but stable condition. live at loyola, derek valcour
. >> these confidential documents report on fbi employees be hating -- behaving badly. is a confidential list of who did what and what consequences they face. the internal fbi documents from 2012 and 2013 were obtained by cnn. some of the misdeeds of listed included an employee you hit a recording device in a supervisor's -- who hid a recording device and a supervisor's office and a supervisor who repeatedly committed check fraud. in each case, the penalty was dismissal. >> we have seen a rash of sext ing cases and people misusing their blackberries. we were hoping that getting the message out would teach people that you cannot do this stuff. >> while the release of the report is embarrassing, the fbi actually has one of the lowest rates of misconduct at any federal agency and lower rates than the private sector. but look of these cases that did not lead to dismissal. one employee was charged with assault and battery. that employee got a 45-day suspension. another employee female nude photographs of herself to her ex-boyfriend wife. when she failed to seize contact, her penalty was a 10 day suspension.
that while he understood that operations needed to be confidential, laws in this country and their interpretation, laws are not supposed to be confidential. ron wyden and a bipartisan group of ten other senators wrote to the president this week asking him to please clear the way for this memo to be released to congress. and then tonight we are told that the president called senator ron wyden himself and said okay, we're going to let you see it. after all this time, we're not only going to admit it exists, we're going to let you guys on the intelligence committee see this memo. it happens the night before the president's nominee to run the cia will appear before the intelligence committee in the senate for confirmation hearing. congressional oversight on national security and war. the executive branch recognizing that this is a rest of the government too, even on national security. oh what a feeling. joining us now is andrea mitching, nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent and the host of andrea mitchell reports on nbc. thanks very much for being here. so why now? how b
confidential. >> okay. thank you. >> sure. >> move approval. >> so we have a motion to approve, and we have a second. >> and no members of the publication indicated that they wanted to address you on the item. so with that roll call (roll call vote ) . >> that is four ayes and item 8 is approved. thank you. >> can we call items 9 and 10 together? >> item 9 is approving the minutes of the november 19th, 2012 meet >> members of the board, good morning and happy new year. i would like to direct your attention to item 9 at the bottom of page 3. this does not actually request what was said at the meeting. the board gave specific direction to staff to come back basically other issues to be studied in the supplemental eir and directions were to come back to the board, either in december or january. now the reason i am addressing you here is that one thing that was really basically skipped over is that the authority mandated in the alignment, but what happened as a result of that is that the platforms have not been pushed back to the other side of main street, on the other side of the street
kidnapper dead after a tense seven-day hostage standoff in an underground bunker. >>> country confidential. the tats, the voice. country superstar turned hollywood hunk tim mcgraw talks music, marriage and what made him quit singing. >>> the super bowl. from beyonce to blackout. the good, bad and viral moments of super bowl xlvii. >> keep it right here america, "nightline >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with juju chang. >> good evening, everyone i'm juju chang. tonight the harrowing standoff that captivated the nation ends in relief as the kidnapped five-year-old boy is rescued from the underground bunker where he was held hostage for seven grueling days. president obama praised the fbi on the daring raid that safely freed the little boy. with the details still unfolding we would like to welcome gio benitez to the broadcast for the first time with the latest from midland, alabama. >> reporter: a happy ending in alabama where the boy kidnapped from a school bus is safe. a new picture of five-year-old ethan. >> i have been to the hospital. i have visited with ethan. he is doing f
detroit in 2009. but awlaki was never charged with a crime. nbc news has obtained this confidential 16-page justice department memo that concludes lethal strikes against u.s. citizens who are operational leaders of al qaeda are a lawful act of national self-defense. >> we only take these kinds of actions when there's an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible, and when we are confident that we're doing so in a way that's consistent with federal and international law. >> reporter: but the memo appears to allow greater leeway than the administration has publicly acknowledged. it says an imminent threat does not require the united states to have clear evidence that a specific attack on u.s. persons and interests will take place in the immediate future. the aclu is challenging obama's drone policy and is suing the u.s. government over awlaki's death on behalf of his family. >> it is a chilling document. it's, you know, it sets out the government's claimed authority to carry out the targeted killing of american citizens. but the limits are really vague and elastic, and it's very easy
. >> indeed. >>> and finally our closing argument. today a confidential memo surfaced and is stirring controversy over the obama administration's use of drone missiles. the document concludes the u.s. can order the killing of american citizens abroad if they're believed to be senior operational leaders of al qaeda. now opponents say the policy goes way too far. what do you think? should the government be given wide berth when it comes to national security? or does this policy violate civil liberties? you can tell us what you think on the "nightline" facebook page or tweet us at "nightline."
the proceedings saying that they are confidential. >>> three people have been shot in bourbon street in new orleans after the street was crawling with revelers. the shooting happened about an hour ago. three people in critical condition. >>> there has opinion a startling increase in the number of rapes in berkeley. there has been nearly double the number. >> the numbers really are shocking. 95% increase in rapes one year over the horse, 2012 over 2011, the highest number in five years but dot numbers really reflect the number of rape crimes in berkeley? what's going on? is it more reporting or are rapes up 95% in berkeley. despite the 39 cases up from just 20 in 2011, it was recorded to the berkeley council on tuesday. >> we are not sure what's behind the increase in reported rapes this year. it's hard to tell whether it's the beginning of a trend or an outliar year >> reporter: but cape pain greenwood says they do nothing something about something that happened. >> the majority of the rapes are acquaintance rapes, where the suspect is a friend. and alcohol plays a part. >> reporter: the hi
forward. here's abc's chris connelly for our series "oscar confidential." >> sally field has been a beloved part of american pop culture for nearly a half century. >> wow, i learned my lesson. >> from her '60s sitcom, "smoky and the bandit" in the '70s. >> why so fast, you late for a big bowling date? >> reporter: and forrest gump in the '70s. today at 66, she has as best actress academy awards as meryl streep does. still, she was undaunted and unabashed to play mary todd lincoln in steven spielberg's "lincoln." >> i'm proud of the film. i'm proud of my work in the film. i'm proud i fought to get in it. >> reporter: proud too to have done it all while deep in the throes of a personal heartbreak she has never before discussed. >> once, mrs. lincoln, i demand of you to try. >> reporter: yet this acclaimed performance, for which she gained 25 pounds, nearly didn't happen despite spielberg's initial enthusiasm for her playing the part. because even though steven had said you're my mary todd lincoln, what had happened? >> i just knew that it would be a battle. because i'm ten years old
. for our series "oscar confidential." enter the world of oscar-winning director ang lee and be prepared for an incredible ride. >> he has to act like the tiger is three feet over his shoulder. >> nominated this year for his 3-d epic "life of pi." the cast, a teenager who had never acted before, and a tiger, both a real one and a digital creation, so expertly woven together that it's impossible to tell the difference. lee spent four years on this film, a year of it editing in this very room, obsessing over every detail. >> is that real? >> it looks so real. it's not. you want to hug that tiger. >> you know this movie frame by frame. >> every pixel. >> the movie is the spiritual journey of a 16-year-old indian boy, hurdled into an amazing adventure when a ship wreck leaves him to fend for himself on a raft with the only other survivor, a bengal tiger. the two drift through the pacific with only each other and god for company. not exactly blockbuster material. you weren't initially going to do it, i read. you were hesitant. >> i was more than hesitant. it was a great read, very inspiring a
for our series "oscar confidential." >> reporter: here's what happens when you combine disney-style fairy tale with a healthy dose of pixar movie magic, "brave" an epic tale of a not-so-fair princess named merida. "brave" grossed more than $500 million, taken home a golden globe and in line to earn pixar a seventh oscar for best animated movie. >> i'm merida first born -- >> reporter: armed with a bow and arrow she's a fiery redheaded last whoredhead ed lass whose battle is more with her mother who is unhappy that unlike other disney princesses, she has no intention of marrying a prince, she's more interested in fighting for her freedom. "brave's" director mark andrews knows a thing or two about freedom, his job description including bows and arrows and he gave us a glimpse in a place he calls an office. >> when i came on board, this is what i do at home and weekends when to have a good time or exercise. >> reporter: it may look like fun and games but this is how the filmmakers actually research. he wanted animators to know how it felt to hold weight of the sword so they could recreate th
confidential. from rihanna's punch-out to justin beesh's smackdown, inside the world of the people paid to protect celebrities, billionaires and v.i.p.s. >>> american women fighting an invisible war, the oscar-nominated documentary shining a light on a hidden epidemic, reaching the military's highest ranks. >> keep it right here america. "nightline" is back in just 60 seconds. [ woman ] don't forget the yard work! okay. [ male announcer ] with citibank's popmoney, dan can easily send money by email right from his citibank account. nice job ben. [ male announcer ] next up, the gutters. citibank popmoney. easier banking. standard at citibank. makes it easy for anne to manage her finances when she's on the go. even when she's not going anywhere. citibank for ipad. easier banking. standard at citibank. >>> from new york city, this is "nightline." with cynthia mcfadden. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. well, move aside nancy drew, these days the hottest new trend in young adult fiction is decidedly adult. racy reads with sexual themes finding a passional ate fan base in young girls
way has found themselves having to deny the press speculation, basically centering on a confidential report prepared by three senior cardinals. it is alleged that there were secret conclaves perhaps involving gay priests. perhaps corruption, money- laundering, cover up. the vatican says that these are unverified and unverifiable. the vatican is keen to stem these reports and are critical of the people who have been repeating them and persisting with their speculation. the report is under lock and key, deep within the vatican safes. it will be passed on to the pope's successor late next month. the newspapers, if they are not just making it up, it really is open to question. >> paul, many thanks indeed. we will stay for a moment, polls are open in what is expected to be a watershed parliament truly at election. -- parliamentary collection. they have a choice between four main candidates, including a scandal-struck billionaire, a comedian, and an economist. the center-left leader is the favorite. he enjoys around 33% of the vote. mario monte is preferred by 13% of voters. he is the tech
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 347 (some duplicates have been removed)

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